VIDEOS.

Check out some of our recent and not-so-recent videos about our values, vision, and mission. You can also stay up-to-date on events, news, and advocacy opportunities on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Who We Are (2019)

Partnership for Safety and Justice is celebrating our 20th anniversary in 2019. Produced for the occasion, this video highlights the many reasons why we’re Oregon’s leading voice for public safety and criminal justice reform.

PSJ is transforming society’s response to crime with innovative solutions that ensure accountability, equity, and healing. Ours was the first policy advocacy organization in the country to bring together people who are justice involved, crime survivors, and the families of both to affect policy change — an approach that has since been adopted across the country.

Why support Partnership for Safety and Justice? (2018)

We were recently selected as one of 150 organizations that are inspiring social change by Willamette Week’s Give!Guide in their campaign to excite new and younger donors to support impactful groups in our region.

We Deserve Better (2013)

The Safe Kids, Safe Communities campaign launched in 2013 to advocate that youth be treated more fairly in Oregon’s criminal justice system. Under Measure 11, kids 15 and over are charged and sentenced as adults. What if we treated youth as capable of positive growth with the potential to change for the better?

Oregon Out of Balance (2012)

In this video collaboration with Call to Safety (formerly the Portland Women’s Crisis Line) and Oregon Coalition against Domestic and Sexual Violence,  we advocated for a public safety system that holds people appropriately accountable, supports crime survivors, and invests in prevent crime through community-based programs — not more prisons.

The Next Right Thing (2011)

Many formerly incarcerated people have done all the right things to make themselves outstanding spouses, mothers, citizens, and employees. Are communities and businesses ready to take steps to do the next right thing and remove employment barriers that keep people from succeeding?